Life Safety Statistics

The following statisticsĀ  underline the importance of protecting your homes or business from the threats of crime and fire with a security and fire detection system.

Crime Statistics
Source: 2007 FBI Uniform Crime Report

  • There were an estimated 2.1 million burglaries in 2007, a 0.2 percent increase over 2006.
  • Burglary accounted for 22.1% of the estimated number of property crimes committed in 2007.
  • Forcible entries accounted for 6.1%.
  • The average dollar loss per burglary offense in 2007 was $1,991.
  • 67.9% of burglaries were residential.
  • 57.4% of burglaries took place during the day and 42.6% at night.
  • 63.6% of residential burglaries occurred during the daytime while 56.4% of nonresidential burglaries occurred during nighttime hours

Crime By Region:
Source: 2007 FBI Uniform Crime Report

The Northeast: The Northeast had an estimated 10.5% of the burglaries nationwide. This is a change of -2.6% from the previous year.

The Midwest :The Midwest had an estimated 20.6% of the burglaries nationwide. This is a change of -2.2% from the previous year.

The South: The South had an estimated 46.7% of the burglaries nationwide. This is a change of +3.3% from the previous year.

The West: The West had an estimated 22.2% of the burglaries nationwide. This is a change of -4.1% from the previous year.

Fire Statistics

Source: 2007 NFPA

  • In 2007, U.S. fire departments responded to an estimated 1,557,500 fires. These fires caused 3,430 civilian deaths and 17,675 civilian injuries.
  • There were 80,100 firefighter injuries in 2007.
  • Home structure fires caused 84% of the civilian fire deaths.
  • Cooking is the leading cause of home structure fires and home fire injuries.
  • Kitchens are the leading area of origin for home structure fires (40%) and civilian home fire injuries (36%).
  • Only 4% of home fires started in the living room, family room, or den; these fires caused 24% of home fire deaths.
  • 8% of reported home fires started in the bedroom. These fires caused 24% of home fire deaths, 21% of home fire injuries, and 15% of the direct property damage.
  • Smoking is a leading cause of civilian home fire deaths.
  • December, January and February were the peak months for reported home structure fires and home fire deaths.
  • Almost two-thirds (63%) of reported home fire deaths resulted from fires in homes with no smoke alarms or no working smoke alarms.
  • Most fatal fires kill one or two people. In 2007, 16 home fires killed five or more people. These 16 fires resulted in 104 deaths.
  • Homes are dwellings, duplexes, manufactured homes, apartments, townhouses, rowhouses, and condominiums.

The 2007 U.S. Fire Loss Clock

  • A fire department responded to a fire every 20 seconds.
  • One structure fire was reported every 59 seconds.
  • One home structure fire was reported every 79 seconds
  • One civilian fire injury was reported every 30 minutes.
  • One civilian fire death occurred every 2 hours and 33 minutes.
  • One outside fire was reported every 41 seconds.
  • One vehicle fire was reported every 122 seconds

Smoke Alarms

  • Almost all households in the U.S. have at least one smoke alarm, yet in 2000-2004, no smoke alarms were present or none operated in almost half (46%) of the reported home fires. (Homes include one- and two-family dwellings, apartments, and manufactured housing.) During the same period, 43% of all home fire deaths resulted from fires in homes with no smoke alarms, while 22% resulted from homes in which smoke alarms were present but did not operate.
  • The death rate per 100 reported fires was twice as high in homes without a working smoke alarm as it was in home fires with this protection. If all homes had working smoke alarms, an estimated 890 lives could be saved annually, or just under one-third the annual fire death toll. Fatalities resulting from home fires with working smoke alarms were more likely to have been in the area of origin, to have tried to fight the fire themselves, or to have been at least 65 years old.
  • Two-thirds of the smoke alarms in reported non-confined home fires were powered solely by batteries. The rest split evenly between hardwired only and hardwired with battery backup. More than half (54%) of the smoke alarm failures were due to missing or disconnected batteries; 19% were due to dead batteries. Nuisance alarms were the leading cause of disabled alarms. Hardwired devices accounted for 29% of the smoke alarms in non-confined fires but problemswith the hardwired power source caused only 7% of the smoke alarm failures.
Posted in Residential.

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